Nerd Homework: Arrow-Verse Catch Up (Minus Arrow)

On Saturday, Juli’s daughter celebrated her first birthday, and I sat around catching up with old friends, and when one asked what I was watching these days, I responded by saying I was chasing my truly epic dive into Supernatural with catching up on the Arrow-verse, except not Arrow.

Chrissy laughed at that, “I love that you’ll do things for your blog that are inconvenient but you draw the line at catching up on Arrow because of your principles.” (Those principles, by the way are Arrow kind of sucks. Except Diggle. We like Diggle.)

There is by the way, nothing inconvenient about catching up on the other three Arrow-verse shows this season as Legends Of Tomorrow remains the best show on TV that no one is watching (and also the queerest), Supergirl did some damn revolutionary social commentary while still being fun, and The Flash managed to be the kind of sweet family drama it should have been all along while also recapturing the silly silver age fun that gave the first season it’s goodness.

Let’s start with those rascally Legends. Sara and the gang on the Waverider are hunting magical creatures and John Constantine is leading the charge. Constantine is a character I have some trouble with. I actually love him in a team setting, or when he pops up to tell other characters to back off because this is mystical and they’re in over their heads, but I’ve never fully bought into him solo. Matt Ryan is awesome, playing him and him getting crossed over here I think bodes well especially as The Crisis looms, and worlds will be consolidated. (I am speaking of course, of Dick Grayson popping up other places.) (Obviously.) (I JUST WANT KARA AND DICK TO TALK IN CIRCLES AROUND EACH OTHER, AND NEVER ACKNOWLEDGE THAT THEY KNOW WHO THE OTHER IS I DON’T THINK THAT’S TOO MUCH TO ASK BERLANTI!) Meanwhile, Nate and Ray’s bromance is so strong it can excorcise demons, Ava and Sara appear to be endgame, Zari’s been erased from the timeline and Mick’s writing career is going splendidly. Also, “Legends of To-Meow-Meow” is a truly wonderful episode of TV, where Zari is a cat. Also, this season has like so many musical numbers. This show is so goddamned weird, and wonderful and special and GAY AS FUCK.

Supergirl, offered an incredible breath of fresh air with a theme that I couldn’t have anticipated them doing particularly well. Taking on Xenophobia and immigration with aliens as a metaphor was a huge risk and my God it paid off. I eventually came around on Brainiac 5. (Though WINN! How I miss him) Nia Nal, the first transgender superhero on TV was a wonder, and Nicole Maine is wonderfully adorable. Alex and James and J’onn are steady centers for the show but remain a tad bit cyphery these days, and the woman at the top, Melissa Benoit remains stunningly stunningly good as Kara Danvers/Zor-El, and this year, as Red Daughter as well. And this season’s villains, Manchester Black, Ben Lockwood AKA Agent Liberty and Lex Frigging Luthor made the whole enterprise even better. Lockwood was played by Sam Witwer, who I’m having kind of a moment with right now. (Might even circle back to Being Human which I remember quite a bit.) He was tragic, terrifying and a lot of fun. But oh boy did the season belong to the big cheese.

Lex Luthor is probably the greatest supervillain of all, or at least the most well known. And John Cryer brought him, his particular brand of ego maniacal malice and obsession to life flawlessly.

Then there’s The Flash. The Flash is probably the most frustrating of any of the Arrow-verse shows, the beginning of the spin off experiment with a really killer first season and fantastic cast, that just kind of fell apart after that. Season 5 does some strong work to bring things back. Nora Allen, Iris and Barry’s daughter from the future is a welcome presence and the mystery behind  her motives to travel back is an intriguing season long mystery. The Big Bad, Cicada is less compelling. He’s a serial killer that goes after metas! Revolutionary, I know. At least he’s not a speedster. But I was overall just sucked in here.

I really wanted to push to complete the season because next season we get Crisis On Infinite Earths, while I doubt this will reach the epic scales of the actual comic, I’m looking forward to how things move. With this being Arrow’s final season there’s a lot of possibility on the table and I am genuinely considering getting caught up there. (We’ll see…)

So, yeah, that’s that. As for what’s next for Nerd Homework? I think I’m going to dive deeper into My Hero Academia. I started it with Aless a few weeks ago and I’d like to get caught up, and it’s been a minute since “Watch More Anime” dipped in. (Supernatural really dominated this year’s nerd homework.)

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Ready For Endgame: Doctor Strange & Guardians Of The Galaxy: Volume 2

Last week I talked about how Ant-Man and Civil War began a time of transition for The MCU, they we’re sort of still in. Doctor Strange and Guardians Of The Galaxy: Volume 2 cement that, one of them making me very wary of leaving behind the world we know, and the other pushing a place we’d glimpsed and enjoyed to it’s borders and succeeding beyond belief.

I do not like Doctor Strange. I remember watching it and receiving it with a hearty “meh,” thinking I might like it on rewatch, but not remembering my reaction to it, and as I watched it finally allowing myself to accept, “I do not like this movie.” It’s overly long, unfocused, and Benedict Cumberbatch doesn’t pull off asshole the way that other actors in this series have managed to. I’m also not crazy about Cumberbatch as an actor in general, so that doesn’t help my assesment of this movie.

But what annoys me the most about Doctor Strange is the way it squanders it’s really excellent supporting cast. If Rachel McAdams had been given a bit more to do, like say, Natalie Portman or Gwyneth Paltrow had, maybe this movie would have been better. If Benedict Wong and Chiowetel Edjiofort had gotten to rise above scowling at Strange as Wong and Mordo, perhaps the movie could have shone. Tilda Swinton and Mads Mikkelson are appropriately ethereal and menacing but still, underwritten.

It’s a poorly executed movie, that looks great, it gets credit for that, and the resolution of repeating the negotiation with Dormammu is a clever ploy, but until that climax, the movie just sits there.

Guardians 2, on the other hand is magical and wonderful and don’t you dare say a bad word against it, you monster. Seriously, I love this movie. I think it’s one of the best scripts for this kind of movie ever. I prefer this soundtrack to the first. (I prefer anything with Fleetwood Mac and Cat Stevens to anything without Fleetwood Mac and Cat Stevens.)

Guardians 2 is heartfelt, intelligent, beautiful and so well acted I watch it slack jawed every time that I watch it. (Which is frequently, I should note.) Kurt Russell is perfect as Ego, and really, my favorite thing about both Guardians movies is that they’re kind of about a bunch of people having temper tantrums on a cosmic scale. It’s super fun to watch.

But mainly, what I love about Guardians 2 is that it’s about family. I like stories about family, because mine is weirdly intertwined with each other. Rocket’s realization that he’s not alone in this crazy world, he has a family now, are so heart wrenchingly good that you’d be insane to not give the guy who made these movies whatever he wants for…oh…yeah…that…

I guess we have to talk about James Gunn, huh? I ranted my feelings about what happened with Gunn when it happened. I think it stinks. HARD. I think it may be impossible for Guardians 3 to bounce back from that setback. (Although they are apparently using his script, which is something.)

But we have two really wonderful movies that Gunn did get to make, by some miracle. (And we’re also apparently getting his take on Suicide Squad!) We live in a world were we all talk about how that space raccoon and the talking tree make us cry, and you know, what, that’s pretty amazing.

Next Week, we’ll talk about the real fun, though, we’ve got Spider-Man: Homecoming and Thor: Ragnaork, and wow, that might be the most fun double feature in the Universe!

Ready For The Team: Young Justice: Outsiders Part 1

So, we’re, here you guys. We’re through the first half of Season 3 of Young Justice, and we’re not getting more until summer.

While I have been having giddy excited brain exploding fangirly squee fests over the episodes as they’ve dropped (usually on Twitter!) this weekend, Aless came over and we watched the whole season and found ourselves, giggling, and gasping and clapping and forming more inside jokes about this. (Aless and I already have a lot of Young Justice based inside jokes. It’s that kind of show. And we’re those kind of friends.)

Here’s the thing, I love Young Justice. I think it’s completely wonderful. The first two seasons have everything I like about superhero stories. Team work, legacy characters, awkward real world metaphors, shipping, Nightwing…season 3, freed of the need to please network people, since it was on DC Universe, took those things and destroyed any barriers that may have previously been holding them back.

Team work? There are like six different teams happening on this show. There’s the Justice League, which Kaldur (now assumed the role of Aquaman,) and Wonder Woman are leading. The Team, which gives the show it’s name, being led by M’gann and Conner. Batman, Inc. lead by Batman, and Batman Inc. Jr (as I’m calling it) being lead by Tim Drake, and Super Secret Spy Team, lead by Dick Grayson.

Legacy Characters? Sure, Kaldur’s Aquaman now, so there’s that. We’re still dealing with Tim Drake as Robin, but we catch glimpses of resurrected Jason. (It’s wonderful) Bart Allen is both Kid Flash and helping his grandmother Iris West-Allen raise his dad and aunt. Conner is very concerned that Clark’s been spending a lot of time off world, so he now has to step up as the Super-being in chief.

OH, right, also we see Talia holding a baby in one episode, and Lois Lane with her son Jon. So you know, the Supersons are coming.

Real world metaphors? Well, this world is dealing with a refugee crisis as Quarac has merged with Bialya and people are trying to escape Queen Bee. Also kids are being kidnapped and tested for meta-genes and being deployed as weapons. (Dick is trying to end this. To be fair.)

Shipping. My god, this show gives good ship. Dick and Barbara are a couple. (Oh, also she’s Oracle now.) M’gann and Conner are engaged, but kind of having some problems. Clone!Roy (who goes by Will) is living with Artemis and there are vibes there, but he’s not really over Cheshire and Artemis’s morning routing still involves waking up to a picture of Wally. (The show has NO CHILL about a lot of things, and one of them is Wally’s death. They’re going to make you sad about whenever possible.) Jaime and Bart are still chilling (They are my out there not really a ship, but yes they are.) Tim and Cassie are still together but strained, and he’s leading a squad that includes Steph. (My heart belongs to Tim and Steph.) New characters Violet (Halo) and Brion (Geoforce) and falling for each other, but she’s also strongly drawn to Cyborg. And Beast Boy is dating Queen Perdita of Lativa (they met at Wally’s funeral.)

Nightwing. There’s so much Nightwing. He’s leading a secret black ops crew to break up a metahuman trafficking ring. He’s bailing on his friends because he’s having trouble connecting since Wally’s death. He’s bringing Black Lighting along on missions where lots of teenagers die, because, I don’t know, he hates Black Lighting? (YOU KILLED A KID! Is one of said new inside jokes.) He’s making out with Barbara, and making bad puns so she rolls her eyes. He’s fighting Jason but he doesn’t know it’s Jason. He’s training the new kids and being kind of a jerk about it. There’s just so much Nightwing. It’s really great.

Straight Arrow

Also, this happens. It brings me great joy.

This is just scratching the surface of all the things that make Young Justice: Outsiders really great, and a good continuation of two seasons of very good TV that came before.

I’m pretty much incapable of putting together coherent thoughts on what makes it great, and I’m not sure why.

Dick and Babs

Oh, wait, that’s why…

Nerd Homework: Birds Of Prey (2002)

Sometimes, I do the nerd homework because it’s something good or essential, sometimes I do it because it’s fun, and sometimes I do it to remind myself that, nope, you made the right call back when you were 14 and this show about Batgirl premiered on The WB and you thought it was dumb.

Birds Of Prey is a bizarre artifact from it’s time period, full of pleather and reheated guitar pop and bad acting and some really muddled DC-verse mythology. If you’re a DC fan, you know The Birds, the all female Gotham-based team, usually lead by Barbara Gordon (Either as Batgirl or Oracle) and Black Canary. They’re fun, sassy and kick copious ass.

The Huntress has been on and off the team in both her iterations, as the alt-verse daughter of Batman and Catwoman, Helena Wayne (my preferred version) or the mob princess turned crime fighter Helena Bertenilli (Also great!).

I don’t think I need to outline my love for Babs and Dinah Lance, because you know, I’ve done that a lot.

Birds Of Prey, the TV show, presents us with Barbara Gordon, as Oracle, seven years since she was paralyzed after being shot by The Joker and Batman disappeared from the city. She’s about the only thing that the show gets right. Intelligent, empathetic, brilliant and driven, this is the Barbara Gordon I know and love.

She’s mentoring Helena Kyle (she refuses to claim the Wayne name) and Dinah Lance, a runaway.

This is where things get infuriating to a DC fan/Confusing to a Filthy Casual.

Helena is the daughter of Batman and Catwoman. Good. OK. Batman’s disappeared from New Gotham (why New? This isn’t a far flung Batman Beyond style future, it hasn’t even been a decade! So weird…) Selina Kyle was killed by The Joker to get at Batman (I mean, fine?) And we’re going by the Batman Returns style Catwoman had cat like powers, which, Helena has inherited. (Ehhh, I like my Bat-characters without powers, for the most part, but again, at least consistent) Helena refers to herself as a Half-Meta. (THAT IS NOT HOW META HUMANS WORK IN ANY VERSION! YOU CAN’T BE HALF META) She also doesn’t wear a costume or mask of any kind. Which is just an exceptionally bad idea.

Then there’s Dinah.

Oh boy did I get screamy about this. Oh, but Dinah didn’t. Yes, rather than Dinah Lance’s actually fun power of emitting disabling sonic booms with her vocal cords, Birds Of Prey makes her a pre-cog.

THERE ARE PLENTY OF DC CHARACTERS WITH PSYCHIC ABILITIES, WHY WOULD YOU GRAFT THAT ON TO A BRAWLER LIKE CANARY?

Also, Alfred is around, because I guess with Bruce all disappeared he’s doesn’t have anything to do.

The big bad is Harley Quinn (An excellent call) except she’s still functioning as Dr. Harleen Quinzel, and she’s like a criminal mastermind, mob boss type? Which is not Harley’s MO at all, and if she’s still practicing, she wouldn’t be Harley at all, you know? It’s confusing.

All of this deviation could be excused if Birds Of  Prey were any good, (Smallville, at least at it’s best is an example of that. Also the whole Arrowverse.) but it isn’t. It feels a little bit like some Charmed and Angel spec scripts had DC grafted on to them and then also you lost the charismatic cast that made Charmed work at all, and Joss Whedon and Tim Minear’s story sense that made Angel one of the greats.

It all feels cheap and dated and my god is it dull. Which is a bummer, because it has solid bones. Doing The Birds Of Prey is an excellent choice for a “Batman without Batman” show, the dynamic of Barbara Gordon in her 30’s, Helena Wayne in her 20’s and a teenage Dinah creates an interesting relationship model. And they really do get Barbara right, so that’s worth something.

But it also screams the Smallville “no tights, no flights,” ethos taken at it’s stupidest. No costumes for Huntress and Harley, in a city that’s already had Batman and Batgirl and the various Robins is a baffling choice. When Helena is considering quitting, which she does three times an episode, at one point, Barbara points out that heroing is an important legacy, carried on by people with potential, people like her, and Dick Grayson! And Tim Drake! And Jason Todd! ALL THOSE PEOPLE! But where are they? Bruce disappeared and the boys are just gone? I can handwave Dick ( In Bludhaven, maybe going through one of his “I work alone” phases) and Jason (Still dead? When was Under The Hood?) but Tim? Tim Drake wouldn’t quit after Barbara became Oracle and Bruce disappeared! Tim Drake would organize and then get all huffy when no one wanted to organize with him. He should be popping out of shadows telling Helena that she’s sloppy and to put a mask on for God’s sake every five minutes. Oh, that might be why he’s not a character on this show. Because that would actually be fun and entertaining, and this show seems allergic to both of those things.

Anyway, it’s nice to know that even as a teenaged girl, I could recognize that this show was shitty nonsense and I remain eternally grateful to Batman The Animated Series and Batman Beyond for exposing me to proper adaptations of this material early on. Also, I’m proud of nerd kind for rejecting it outright, even back in the dark ages when we thought that Brian Singer’s X-Men was the closest we’d get to the source material. (Though I can’t help but wonder if it’s forgotten for being both terrible and lady centric.)

I have a lot of affection for The WB, the network of my teen years. Both sides, what I call the Buffy side (Buffy, Angel, Charmed, Smallville, Supernatural) and the Dawson’s side (Dawson’s Creek, Felicity, One Tree Hill, Gilmore Girls, also Smallville) (That Smallville straddles both is really the show’s greatest achievement.) but they, for the most part relied on a formula, and any half assing of a formula is going to be bleak.

Justin Hartley Green Arrow

Smallville’s SECOND greatest achievement. Making me give a shit about Green Arrow(‘s abs)

The Nerd Homework feature has been all about challenging my preconceptions of stuff in my wheelhouse, that I’ve previously put off or ruled out. That is the Raison d’etre for these projects. Star Trek, Battlestar, Anime, the work of Stephen King. Which is why Birds Of Prey being on DC Universe felt like a blessing. I’d outright rejected the show twice before after watching the pilot (when it first aired and then after Arrow premiered when CW Seen was pushing it.) but maybe now I’d enjoy it.

I did not. It’s terrible. It deserves it’s fate of obscurity and mocking.

60 Books In 2018 #3: Crisis On Infinite Earths by Marv Wolfman and George Perez

OK so, I picked this up so that I would have a basis of comparison for when the Arrowverse version coming next fall.

Also, just because as I get back into superheroes (not that I was ever not into them, but you know what I mean!) and back into reading superhero comics this seemed a good place to start. (Seriously, last year the only superhero book I read was Grayson.) Like all it’s later immitators, Crisis On Infinite Earths is both wonderful and befuddling, and delightful and dull, all at once.

Wolfman’s story meant to forever simplify the DC Universe by streamlining it’s many alternate worlds into one, but only served to show the company that big crossovers will sell books and also that killing a Flash from time to time is to be expected, is given a huge leg up but Perez’s art. Seriously, I’m not even big into that era of comic book art, (I came to comics post Image and the glossy style of Jim Lee & Co really shaped my taste.) but Perez just so so good.

The story, though, well, let’s talk about that. The Monitor and Anti-Monitor are battling for the universe, and The Monitor calls the greatest heroes from across the multiverse to his side. Two Supermen, Supergirl, The Flash, Captain Marvel and many others, join in the battle, which in the end destroys worlds, and everyone forgets and the DC Universe spins on, but simpler, until it isn’t.

What Crisis really represents is a the last gasp of a certain time in comics. It was published in 1985, just before the earth shaking forces of Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns changed everything. Crisis was trying to simplify a status quo that was about to be obliterated anyway, but on it’s own, it’s a fun exciting superhero story.

When it comes to The Arrowverse, my guess is that it’s going to end with Kara Zor-El’s world merging with those of Barry Allen and Oliver Queen.

But by this time next year, we’ll know.

Up next is The Golem and The Jinni by Helene Wecker. I’ve joined the book club at my library and this is the book this month, so I’ve gotta get it read.

Don’t Be Robin, Be Someone Else

I’m the first to admit that my hype for Titans went from, “THIS IS GOING TO BE GREAT,” to “Oh no,” to “people are saying it’s pretty good and I’m getting DC Universe for Young Justice: Outsiders anyway, so I’ll get around to it.”

Look, that “Fuck Batman,” trailer was rough, no way around it. And I’m still not sold on the designs for Starfire and Beast Boy. And that Donna Troy never suits up is kind of a bummer. (Spoilers, sorry…)

But, Internet Nerds, we have greatly misjudged this show. It’s pretty wonderful. As an adaptation of Teen Titans, it’s only OK, but as a genre show in it’s own right, a version and riff on the concept, it’s good. It’s full of game performances, excellent character work, and a steady build up of suspenseful writing leading to a hell of a cliff hanger.

I’m not going to say it’s the best first season of a live action superhero show. Daredevil season 1 exists after all, but it’s damn sure of it’s self and super entertaining all the way through, which is more than I can say for any other DC TV project from the past 10 years. (I loved the first seasons of The Flash and Supergirl but they still had their bumpy finding their feet moments.)

And it has it’s problems. The costume designs really are awful. Minka Kelly’s wig as Dove is one for the DCTV bad wig hall of fame. Geoff Johns seems a little too happy to drop the F-bomb. It’s refreshing that the young heroes actually talk like young people, but it’s also, you know, kind of heavy handed at times. The FX are laughably bad at points. The violence is a lot, but not unexamined. I was mostly concerned about this from the perspective of Dick.

Kori and Rachel (Raven) being more violent is consistent. Starfire, being an alien and all, has different values about life than humans do. Raven’s powers are all about darkness and containing bursts of violence. Titans examines both of these perspectives, Rachel desperately trying to contain her power, and Kori accepting it as a part of herself.

Dick though, it’s handled masterfully. The show begins by showing it’s been a year since he walked away from being Batman’s partner, because he felt himself losing control. But he’s basically addicted to the violence, and he’s not happy about it. The entire season and his entire arc (and the show really does belong the Brenton Thwaites) is him grappling with this side of himself. He knows he can’t really be Robin anymore, but he doesn’t know how to deal with this any other way.

This all really hits home in two episodes, which are easily my favorites, episode 6, “Jason Todd,” and Episode 8, “Donna Troy.” Jason, a year into his tenure as Robin is eager and excited to spend time with his predecessor. Dick is mostly annoyed by Jason’s, well, Jason-ness (Seriously, he’s perfect.), Bruce’s seeming trust of his new partner, (“You’re allowed to drive the Batmobile?”) and most especially, the kid’s sanity and safety. I burst into tears when Dick warned Jason, “the cost is too great.” THEY DON’T EVEN KNOW  THE COST YET! Even in Dick’s “darkest timeline,” created in his mind by Trigon in the finale, Jason is paralyzed, not brutally murdered, then resurrected and insane. (This show is uniquely well set up to do Red Hood as a storyline though.)

“Donna Troy,” meanwhile, just made me gloriously happy as a Dick Grayson fan. Donna’s retired from being Wonder Girl, but she’s still doing her part, and working as a photographer. Dick goes to see her, they talk a lot, there’s a really good flashback to when they were kids where she gives him a pep talk and there’s also a scene where they go to a party and Dick babbles like an idiot to some unsuspecting friends of hers. He says things like, “my dad used to work with her mom sometimes.” (STAHP! MY FANGIRL INSIDES CANNOT HANDLE IT) She says things like, “Wonder Woman was created to protect the innocent, Batman to punish the guilty.” They giggle and do backflips, they track down some big game poachers. They drink beers and confide. This is a very good depiction of friendship between superheroes.

Also, Donna continues to be awesome throughout her run on the show.

So, to recap, things that Titans isn’t great on

  • Design – It’s an ugly show. That can be improved as we move forward though. I also did like Jason’s Robin suit.
  • Effects – They’re groan worthy in places, but again, now that it’s a hit (apparently? Streaming’s weird that way) maybe they’ll get a budget increase to help with that.
  • Tone – Scale back on the angst a bit, it worked but tipped too far a few times

Things that are good

  • Characters & Writing – Everything’s consistent and well thought out.
  • Violence – It’s a violent show, but it actually grapples with that violence. Which is a nice change of pace.
  • Dick Grayson – Seriously, this is a very good version of this character. Who I love. Kind of a lot. 

This Is Gonna Be Fun

Aquaman_poster.jpg

I think DC has finally figured out how to stand out, and it’s magic and myth.

Marvel’s got the whole team up thing on lockdown. While I’d love to see everyone cross paths again some day, the only times, since Nolan gave up the reigns on Batman, that WB’s superhero movies have worked have been when they leaned hard into mysticism and magic.

Aquaman is a superhero movie, sure, but it’s much more of a fantasy quest film. The King returning to the throne that was denied him. The lesser prince, desparately grabbing at something that was never supposed to be his to begin with. The Goddesses guiding the path of the hero. And it’s lifted up by some really game performances that are tuned to exactly what they need to be. Nicole Kidman, Amber Heard (despite her truly terrible, terrible wig), Willem Dafoe, Dolph Lundgren (the stealth MVP of this year’s movie season!) and Jason Momoa all commit and run with every goofy curve ball thrown at them.

But this movie had one huge highlight for me.

I once noted that Patrick Wilson has been banging his head against the mainstream door for so long, it’s gotten sad. He could have been one of the Broadway greats, but ceded that throne to others (Christian Borle, Norbert Leo Butz both better than him btw) chasing a segment of the industry that didn’t know how to use him. But my God, his performance here as, Orm, Sea Master (SQUEE!) is a sight to behold, and the perfect foil to Jason Momoa’s flinty bro version of Arthur Curry. He’s ice cold patrician aristocracy, merciless and unbending, which, of course becomes his undoing. It’s my favorite villain performance in a super film in quite a long time. Maybe since Loki’s turn in The Avengers. (It’s not quite that good, but it’s very good.) Yahya Abdul-Mateen II turns in a good B-line villain performance as Black Manta as well.

The action is great, the script is well constructed, if a little too quick to laugh it’s self and it’s well performed. It’s not a game changer, but not everything needs to be. Somethings simply are what they are.

Rankings:

  1. Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse
  2. Aquaman
  3. The Incredibles 2
  4. Bohemian Rhapsody
  5. A Star Is Born
  6. Solo: A Star Wars Story
  7. Creed 2
  8. Deadpool 2
  9. Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again!
  10. Ocean’s 8
  11. Infinity War
  12. Ant-Man And The Wasp
  13. Venom

Trailers:

Avengers: Endgame: Oh wow, you guys, I am going to weep at this one. Like a baby. I know it.

Shazam!: I can’t wait for this truly, and I think leans into my theory about DC and magic and myths. Wonder Woman is the daughter of gods and Aquaman is a prophesied king and Captain Marvel/Shazam is given his powers by a wizard.

Still no Captain Marvel trailer. BOOOO.