60 Books In 2019 #15: The Vampire Armand By Anne Rice

Armand has always been my favorite of Anne Rice’s vampires, even back when I had only read Interview, and seen the movies, I loved him. I loved that he knew he was the bad guy in this story, and frankly being played by Antonio Banderas doesn’t hurt.

But here’s my favorite thing about The Vampire Chronicles in general as they continue to unfurl, and it’s the way that Rice plays with unreliable narrators. We met these characters first through Louis, who’s perspective is skewed by his love of aestethics, his relatively short life in comparison to the other vampires, and his all consuming grief at the loss of Claudia. Of course he’d see Armand, who never denied the evil of what they have to do to survive as evil incarnate.

Then we meet them through Lestat. Who, while I adore him, is a complete and total blowhard. Armand’s quiet intensity and belief in anything, let alone a God who’d wish to punish the creatures of the night would be antithetical to Lestat’s view of the world as a playground for his grand adventures.

Now we have Armand’s story. The story of how the talented boy Andrei became the slave Amadeo who then became the vampire Armand. We learn about his kidnapping, his apprenticeship with Marius (Ah, Marius) as well as their love and then finally, his second kidnapping by Santino which lead to his leading the Paris coven of vampires, which then evolved into The Theatre De Vampire, and his turning of Daniel, at the begining of Queen Of The Damned. Which, you know, I kind of forgot about?

Armand views this as his most monstrous action, because he thinks turning humans is disgusting. (The killing is a necessary evil, but to rob them of normal lives is obscene. Seriously, I love Armand!) 

The book is framed by Armand giving his tale to David Talbot after the events of Memnoch The Devil, which is when it gets Jesus-y (of course it gets Jesus-y), Armand admits he was always religious, which was what made him easy prey. He’s also formed a small human family around himself, which as he heals from his leap into the sun, (will Armand now be the greatest vampire to ever vampire because he survived the same thing as Lestat? I sure hope so.) And in what I really, really enjoyed as a horrible finale, he surrenders the protection of his pet humans to Marius and Pandora, thinking they’ll care for them as he gets better, and when he goes back to find them all, find that Marius has turned them.

I was so happy to see the vampires behaving like monsters again. To see their nature made cruel and odd all over again. We’ve been living too long with Louis and Lestat and their moral codes of only killing killers, and never changing anyone again, and all that.

Armand knows he’s the bad guy. Marius knows he’s the bad guy. They’re much more interesting at this point.

Next up is Molly’s Game by Molly Bloom, because you know what? Let’s get some dumb Hollywood trash juice around her. It’s been a while.

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